10 science documentaries you should watch before you die

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Today I’m gonna tell you some of the top science you should watch if you love science.No more time waste lets jump to no.10

No.10: David Attenborough’s First Life

Released:2010

Storyline:In fifty years of broadcasting, Sir David Attenborough has traveled the globe to document the living world in all its wonder. Now, in the landmark series, David Attenborough’s First Life, he completes his journey by going back in time to the roots of the tree of life, in search of the very first animals.

Attenborough’s journey begins in a forest near his childhood home in Leicester, where a fossil discovery transformed our understanding of the evolution of complex life. Traveling to the fog bound coastline of Newfoundland and the Australian outback, Attenborough unearths the earliest forms of animal life to exist on Earth.

Attenborough’s journey continues in Canada’s Rocky Mountains, where fossils document an explosion in animal diversity never seen before or since. Traveling from there to North Africa, the rain forests of Australia and the east coast of Scotland, Attenborough discovers how animals evolved to conquer not only the oceans but also the land and air.

These bizarre and wonderful creatures are brought to life with the help of cutting edge scientific technology and photo-realistic visual effects. From the first animal forms that moved to the first mouths that ate, these were creatures that evolved the traits and tools that allow all animals, including ourselves, to survive to this day.

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No.9 : The Brain that Changes Itself

Released :2008

storyline: There’s so much about the human brain that continues to baffle and mystify our top medical researchers, but one aspect of its complex design is starting to come into focus. Contrary to previous widely held beliefs, the human brain exists in a perpetual state of constant change. The documentary The Brain That Changes Itself explores these groundbreaking findings as heralded in a book of the same title by psychiatrist and researcher Dr. Norman Doidge.

For four hundred years, the common perception was that the brain worked much like a computer, and its functionalities were set as firmly in place as any machine. But what if the brain is actually morphing and maturing at all times based on the stimuli of its environment? Such a notion, as argued by Dr. Droidge, would alter our perspectives on brain disease and dysfunction, and revolutionize our understanding of human nature itself.

The revolution began with the discovery of neuroplasticity, a term used to describe the structural changes of neurons in response to factors like environment, thought processes, and bodily injury. The phenomenon of neuroplasticity provides evidence of the brain’s stunning malleability, and its inherent capacity to overcome and adapt to even the most severe challenges. Ongoing studies are indicating that in many cases, the healthy parts of the brain can be recruited to supplant those that are defective.

Dr. Droidge has not come to these conclusions on his own. They result from the tireless efforts of some of the world’s most progressive medical scientists. The Brain That Changes Itselfintroduces us to many of these brilliant figures as well as a host of patients who have benefited from their brave new world of research. Their findings offer hope to victims of crippling neurological conditions like stroke, cerebral palsy, and chronic depression.

The implications set forth are not limited to the treatment of traumatic injury. This exciting realm of medical science can point the way to a more enlightened existence, and unlock a potential in the human species never before believed possible. For that reason alone, this film is a fascinating exploration that is relevant to all viewers.

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No.8: Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space

Released: 1994

storyline:The earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and triumph, they can become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on this scarcely distinguishable inhabitant of some other corner. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatred. Our posturing, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in this universe are challenged by this point of pale light.

As the ancient myth makers knew, we’re children equally of the earth and the sky. In our tenor on this planet, we’ve accumulated dangerous evolutionary baggage – propensities for aggressions and ritual, submissions to leaders, hostility to outsiders – all of which puts our survival in some doubt. But we’ve also acquired compassion for others, love for our children, a desire to learn from history and experience, and a great, soaring, passionate intelligence – the clear tools for our continued survival and prosperity.

Which aspects of our nature will prevail is uncertain, particularly when our visions and prospects are bound to one small part of this small planet earth. But up there in the cosmos, an inescapable perspective awaits. National boundaries are not evident when we view the earth from space. Fanatic ethnic or religious or national identifications are little difficult to support when we see our planet as a fragile blue crescent fading to become an inconspicuous point of light against the vast citadel of the stars.

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No.7: Richard Feynman: The Character of Physical Law

Released:1964

Storyline:probably this is one of the oldest films posted among the list. The Character of Physical Law is a series of seven lectures by physicist Richard Feynman concerning the nature of the laws of physics.

The talks were delivered by Feynman in 1964 at Cornell University, as part of the Messenger Lectures series. Their text was published by the BBC in 1965 in a book by the same name.

The lectures covered the following topics: The law of gravitation – an example of physical law, The relation of mathematics to physics, The great conservation principles, Symmetry in physical law, The distinction of past and future, Probability and uncertainty – the quantum mechanical view of nature, and Seeking new laws.

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No.6: Absolute Zero

Released:2008

storyline: This two-part scientific detective tale tells the story of a remarkable group of pioneers who wanted to reach the ultimate extreme: absolute zero, a place so cold that the physical world as we know it doesn’t exist, electricity flows without resistance, fluids defy gravity and the speed of light can be reduced to 38 miles per hour.

Each film features a strange cast of eccentric characters, including Clarence Birds Eye; Frederic ‘Ice King’ Tudor, who founded an empire harvesting ice; and James Dewar, who almost drove himself crazy by trying to liquefy hydrogen.

Absolute zero became the Holy Grail of temperature physicists and is considered the gateway to many new technologies, such as nano-construction, neurological networks, and quantum computing. The possibilities, it seems, are limitless.

The bizarre story of how one court magician’s use of alchemy made a King shiver. Could the future become a strange quantum world as physicists get within a few millionths of a degree of this absolute zero?


No. 5 : Arithmetic, Population and Energy (Lecture)

Released:2005

Storyline: Professor Bartlett has given his celebrated one-hour lecture, Arithmetic, Population, and Energy: Sustainability 101 over 1,600 times to audiences with an average attendance of 80 in the United States and worldwide. His audiences have ranged from junior high school and college students to corporate executives and scientists, and to congressional staffs.

He first gave the talk in September 1969, and subsequently has presented it an average of once every 8.5 days for 36 years. His talk is based on his paper, Forgotten Fundamentals of the Energy Crisis, originally published in the American Journal of Physics, and revised in the Journal of Geological Education.

Professor Al Bartlett begins his one-hour talk with the statement, The greatest shortcoming of the human race is our inability to understand the exponential function.

He then gives a basic introduction to the arithmetic of steady growth, including an explanation of the concept of doubling time. He explains the impact of unending steady growth on the population of Boulder, of Colorado, and of the world.

He then examines the consequences steady growth in a finite environment and observes this growth as applied to fossil fuel consumption, the lifetimes of which are much shorter than the optimistic figures most often quoted.

He proceeds to examine oddly reassuring statements from experts, the media, and political leaders – statements that are dramatically inconsistent with the facts. He discusses the widespread worship of economic growth and population growth in western society.

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No.4: Richard Feynman: Fun to Imagine

Released:1983

Storyline:Richard Feynman (1918-88) was one of the most remarkable and gifted theoretical physicists of any generation.

He was also known as the Great Explainer because of his passion for helping non-scientists to imagine something of the beauty and order of the universe as he saw it.

In this series, Feynman looks at the mysterious forces that make ordinary things happen and, in doing so, answers questions about why rubber bands are stretchy, why tennis balls can’t bounce forever and what you’re really seeing when you look in the mirror.

Well, While you’re here you can also check out The Pleasure of Finding Things Out.

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No.3 :Cosmos: A Personal Voyage

Released:1980

Storyline:With Cosmos, Carl Sagan and his wife and co-writer, Ann Druyan, brilliantly illustrated the underlying science of his same-titled book, placing the human species within a space-and-time context that brought the infinite into stunningly clear view. The series, which originally aired in 1980 on PBS, has been seen by more than 700 million people worldwide and remains a high-water mark in miniseries history.

Sagan lucidly explains such topics as Einstein’s theory of relativity, Darwin’s theory of evolution, and the greenhouse effect, bringing the mysteries of the universe down to a layman’s level of understanding. The footage in these remastered, seven-DVD or seven-VHS sets is as fresh and riveting as it was two decades ago and is certain to fire the imaginations of a whole new generation of viewers. This is THE GREATEST television series ever.

This documentary inspired me to a love of science, learning, and freedom of inquiry that have shaped both my interests and intellectual curiosity. Of the hundreds of high-quality science doc series released in the interim, none approach the majesty and depth of this one. An elegant and artistic enterprise for a well-organized, self-correcting way of reasoning and thinking about the universe/time we occupy. After a quarter of a century, this series is as captivating as it is an education.

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No.2 : Hubble: Universe in Motion

Released:2015

Storyline:The Hubble Space Telescope is one of the towering scientific and technological achievements of our age, and it has deepened our capacity for observation and discovery beyond measure. The documentary Hubble: Universe in Motion probes the revelations brought forth from this breathtaking invention and celebrates its role in forever altering our understanding of the universe.

First launched into orbit in April of 1990, the Hubble telescope remains in operation to this day. It’s captured a series of beautiful and fascinating details which may hold the key to comprehending the mysteries of an evolving galaxy. Reaching depths and realms of space never before documented or even imagined, the Hubble has enabled top astronomers tremendous insights into the history and functions of solar systems, black holes, exploding stars, planets and even the possibility of intergalactic life.

Hubble: Universe in Motion summarizes several of the most profound discoveries made possible by the Hubble. For example, the telescope has successfully traced the violent process of star formation and offered clues relating to the course of each star’s entire life span. Armed with this knowledge, scientists can reasonably predict the future of our own Sun. In another segment of the film, we learn how the unparalleled resolution of Hubble telescope imagery has allowed astronomers the ability to pinpoint characteristics of the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies in greater detail than ever before. They’ve also uncovered the existence of massive black holes residing in the center of the most active galaxies in the universe, examined the most obscure blemishes on Pluto’s surface, and basked in the awe-inspiring intricacies of Saturn’s majestic rings.

The documentary is populated by the gorgeous and revealing imagery captured by the Hubble telescope over the last quarter of a century. In that brief amount of time, the Hubble has answered many of the questions that have long plagued the most ardent astronomy enthusiasts and inspired new queries that had not previously been considered. The film uses clear and crisp narration to explain complex scientific concepts and offers precious insight into the origins of the universe and our place within it.

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And for number-1 I have

Richard Feynman: The Pleasure of Finding Things Out

Released:1981

Storyline:The Pleasure of Finding Things Out was filmed in 1981 and will delight and inspire anyone who would like to share something of the joys of scientific discovery. Feynman is a master storyteller, and his tales – about childhood, Los Alamos, or how he won a Nobel Prize – are a vivid and entertaining insight into the mind of a great scientist at work and play.

In this candid interview, Feynman touches on a wide array of topics from the beauty of nature to particle physics. He explains things that are hard to grasp in layman’s terms much like Carl Sagan did in the cosmos series. His explanation of the scientific method covers what we know, why we know it and most importantly, what we don’t know and the pleasure of figuring it out.

While the video quality is less than desirable the content of this program more than makes up for it. Professor Sir Harry Kroto, Nobel Prize for Chemistry said “The 1981 Feynman Horizon is the best science program I have ever seen. This is not just my opinion – it is also the opinion of many of the best scientists that I know who have seen the program… It should be mandatory viewing for all students whether they be science or arts students.”

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Links, you can watch all documentaries here

10.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVBDXv4rzvY&feature=youtu.be

9.https://youtu.be/bFCOm1P_cQQ

8.https://youtu.be/5wZauL04R9s

7.https://youtu.be/j3mhkYbznBk?list=PL85FE0A635887998C

6.https://youtu.be/y2jSv8PDDwA

5.https://youtu.be/cOrvGDRLT7A

4.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3pYRn5j7oI&feature=youtu.be&list=PL04B3F5636096478C

3.https://youtu.be/D_uSLgq0Kt0?list=PLpdQFf-hBsbpJlFf5owyxWHTHYP4AQBTV

2.https://youtu.be/IN1KJ8LYW3U

1.http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/pleasure-finding-things-out/


 

 

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